Mindfulness – new age rah rah or real?

There’s a lot of talk about mindfulness these days, with some pretty big benefit claims. But is this just new age rah rah or are there real, demonstrated, benefits of mindfulness? And more specifically, is it of benefit to doctors?

Five key benefits of mindfulness training

According to “Doing and Being: Mindfulness, Health, and Quiet Ego Characteristics among Buddhist Practitioners,” the 2011 research article that published the survey results in the Journal of Happiness Studies (12(4): 575-589), there were five key ways that mindfulness training increased physical and mental health:  

  1. It strengthened immune system and physiological responses to stress and negative emotions.
  2. It improved social relationships with family and strangers.
  3. It reduced stress, depression, and anxiety and increased well-being and happiness.
  4. It increased openness to experience, conscientiousness, and agreeableness and reduced negative associations with neuroticism.
  5. It led to greater psychological mindfulness, which included an awareness that is clear, nonconceptual, and flexible; a practical stance toward reality; and present attention to the individual’s consciousness and awareness.

"One of the surprising findings of this study and what some others are coming up with is how much of a difference it makes to focus your mind and calm down. It actually makes a large difference in your well-being.”

Meditative mindfulness practices have been shown to positively alter the structure and neural patterns in the brain and strengthen the brain regions associated with heightened sensory processing and empathetic response. Therefore, individuals who regularly practices mindfulness training are quite literally reforming the structure of their brains to achieve desired outcomes. “We are finding more and more that the human brain is quite adaptable, as we have learnt that the brain reroutes information through new neuropathways, so in addition to the mind being adaptable, the brain too has this quality,” author of a study conducted at Northern Arizona University, Bruce Sullivan explains. Individuals who said they meditated even once a day reported greater psychological mindfulness.  

The difference between psychological mindfulness and meditative practices

Psychological mindfulness is a trait-like quality in which the individual maintains an open, accepting, present focus or attention during day-to-day life whereas mindfulness-based meditative practices include a type of mindfulness-based meditation that includes focusing on something specific, such as the individual’s breath or an object to bring awareness and concentration to the present moment. Living in modern society often leaves people feeling stressed, irritable, and exhausted. Mindfulness allows people to gain the benefits of mediation while going about their everyday activities. For these reason it is a great tool for busy medical practitioners who might struggle to take 20 minutes out of their day to meditate.

The findings from The Buddhist Health Study reveal that people are capable of transforming their everyday lives into empowering realities with a greater sense of physical and psychological well being. “The Buddhist ideals are that whatever you practice, that is what you are becoming, so if you practice being angry and shouting and so forth, you become very accomplished in doing that,” states Sullivan. “On the other hand, if you practice loving kindness, compassion and so forth, you are making yourself into that type of person.”  Thus achieving better physical well being or psychological health comes from sharpening the mind to focus and be more successfully aware.

As this study demonstrates, the conscious ability to transform an individual’s mind is perhaps the greatest ability humans have at hand to shape the direction of their lives and positively affect the lives of others around them. 

So how can doctors practice mindfulness in the busy clinical setting?

“Our true home is not in the past. Our true home is not in the future. Our true home is in the here and the now. Life is available only in the here and the now, and it is our true home.” Thich Nhat Hanh

Mindfulness is the energy that helps us recognise the conditions of happiness are already present in our lives.

Most people are forgetful; they are not really there a lot of the time. Their minds are caught in their worries, their fears their angers, and their regrets. The opposite of forgetfulness is mindfulness. Mindfulness is when you are truly here, mind and body together.

Mindfulness practice should be enjoyable, not work or effort. Do you have to make an effort to breathe in? You don’t need to strain, you just breathe in. For doctors this is an important point because this does not need to be another ‘task to do’ in your already busy day.

Five mindfulness exercises by Thich Nhat Hanh

These five exercises have been great for me, because they are easy, they take no extra time, and most importantly, they work.

 

First Mindfulness Exercise: Mindful Breathing

“The first exercise is very simple, but the power, the result, can be very great. The exercise is simply to identify the in-breath as in-breath and the out-breath as out-breath. When you breathe in, you know that this is your in-breath. When you breathe out, you are mindful that this is your out-breath.

Just recognise: this is an in-breath, this is an out-breath. Very simple, very easy. In order to recognise your in-breath as in-breath, you have to bring your mind home to yourself. What is recognizing your in-breath is your mind, and the object of your mind—the object of your mindfulness—is the in-breath. Mindfulness is always mindful of something. When you drink your tea mindfully, it’s called mindfulness of drinking. When you walk mindfully, it’s called mindfulness of walking. And when you breathe mindfully, that is mindfulness of breathing.

So the object of your mindfulness is your breath, and you just focus your attention on it. Breathing in, this is my in-breath. Breathing out, this is my out-breath. When you do that, the mental discourse will stop. You don’t think anymore. You don’t have to make an effort to stop your thinking; you bring your attention to your in-breath and the mental discourse just stops. That is the miracle of the practice. You don’t think of the past anymore. You don’t think of the future. You don’t think of your projects, because you are focusing your attention, your mindfulness, on your breath.

It gets even better. You can enjoy your in-breath. The practice can be pleasant, joyful.

Someone who is dead cannot take any more in-breaths. But you are alive. You are breathing in, and while breathing in, you know that you are alive. The in-breath can be a celebration of the fact that you are alive, so it can be very joyful. When you are joyful and happy, you don’t feel that you have to make any effort at all. I am alive; I am breathing in. To be still alive is a miracle. The greatest of all miracles is to be alive, and when you breathe in, you touch that miracle. Therefore, your breathing can be a celebration of life.

An in-breath may take three, four, five seconds, it depends. That’s time to be alive, time to enjoy your breath. You don’t have to interfere with your breathing. If your in-breath is short, allow it to be short. If your out-breath is long, let it be long. Don’t try to force it. The practice is simple recognition of the in-breath and the out-breath. That is good enough. It will have a powerful effect.

Try it between patients and see how it goes.

 

Second Mindfulness Exercise: Concentration

The second exercise is that while you breathe in, you follow your in-breath from the beginning to the end. If your in-breath lasts three or four seconds, then your mindfulness also lasts three or four seconds. Breathing in, I follow my in-breath all the way through. Breathing out, I follow my out-breath all the way through. From the beginning of my out-breath to the end of my out-breath, my mind is always with it. Therefore, mindfulness becomes uninterrupted, and the quality of your concentration is improved.

So the second exercise is to follow your in-breath and your out-breath all the way through. Whether they are short or long, it doesn’t matter. What is important is that you follow your in-breath from the beginning to the end. Your awareness is sustained. There is no interruption. Suppose you are breathing in, and then you think, “Oh, I forgot to turn off the light in my room.” There is an interruption. Just stick to your in-breath all the way through. Then you cultivate your mindfulness and your concentration. You become your in-breath. You become your out-breath. If you continue like that, your breathing will naturally become deeper and slower, more harmonious and peaceful. You don’t have to make any effort—it happens naturally.

Note from the Dr Sam Hazledine:“To start with I found meditation really difficult because of the long periods of time that was recommended. Mindful breathing is a pleasure because you’re not asking your brain to concentrate for long, just the length of a breath.”

 

Third Mindfulness Exercise: Awareness of Your Body

The third exercise is to become aware of your body as you are breathing. “Breathing in, I am aware of my whole body.” This takes it one step further.

In the first exercise, you became aware of your in-breath and your out-breath. Because you have now generated the energy of mindfulness through mindful breathing, you can use that energy to recognize your body.

“Breathing in, I am aware of my body. Breathing out, I am aware of my body.” I know my body is there. This brings the mind wholly back to the body. Mind and body become one reality. When your mind is with your body, you are well-established in the here and the now. You are fully alive. You can be in touch with the wonders of life that are available in yourself and around you.

This exercise is simple, but the effect of the oneness of body and mind is very great. In our daily lives, we are seldom in that situation. Our body is there but our mind is elsewhere. Our mind may be caught in the past or in the future, in regrets, sorrow, fear, or uncertainty, and so our mind is not there. Someone may be present in the house, but he’s not really there, his mind is not there. His mind is with the future, with his projects, and he’s not there for his children or his spouse. Maybe you could say to him, “Anybody home?” and help him bring his mind back to his body.

So the third exercise is to become aware of your body. “Breathing in, I’m aware of my body.” When you practice mindful breathing, the quality of your in-breath and out-breath will be improved. There is more peace and harmony in your breathing, and if you continue to practice like that, the peace and the harmony will penetrate into the body, and the body will profit.

 

Fourth Mindfulness Exercise: Releasing Tension

The next exercise is to release the tension in the body. When you are truly aware of your body, you notice there is some tension and pain in your body, some stress. The tension and pain have been accumulating for a long time and our bodies suffer, but our mind is not there to help release it. Therefore, it is very important to learn how to release the tension in the body.

In a sitting, lying, or standing position, it’s always possible to release the tension. You can practice total relaxation, deep relaxation, in a sitting or lying position. While you are driving your car, you might notice the tension in your body. You are eager to arrive and you don’t enjoy the time you spend driving. When you come to a red light, you are eager for the red light to become a green light so that you can continue. But the red light can be a signal. It can be a reminder that there is tension in you, the stress of wanting to arrive as quickly as possible. If you recognise that, you can make use of the red light. You can sit back and relax—take the ten seconds the light is red to practice mindful breathing and release the tension in the body.

So next time you’re stopped at a red light, you might like to sit back and practice the fourth exercise: “Breathing in, I’m aware of my body. Breathing out, I release the tension in my body.” Peace is possible at that moment, and it can be practiced many times a day—in the workplace, doing ward rounds, while you are driving, while you are cooking, while you are doing the dishes, while you are watering the vegetable garden. It is always possible to practice releasing the tension in yourself.

 

Fifth Mindfulness Exercise: Walking Meditation

When you practice mindful breathing you simply allow your in breath to take place. You become aware of it and enjoy it. Effortlessness. The same thing is true with mindful walking. Every step is enjoyable. Every step helps you touch the wonders of life. Every step is joy. That is possible.

You don’t have to make any effort during walking meditation, because it is enjoyable. You are there, body and mind together. You are fully alive, fully present in the here and the now. With every step, you touch the wonders of life that are in you and around you. When you walk like that, every step brings healing. Every step brings peace and joy, because every step is a miracle.

The real miracle is not to fly or walk on fire. The real miracle is to walk on the Earth, and you can perform that miracle at any time. Just bring your mind home to your body, become alive, and perform the miracle of walking on Earth.”

 

Give it a go

The evidence is there, it’s undeniable, mindfulness is good for us. Even some health insurance companies in the US are acknowledging this and discounting premiums for people who practice it because of the demonstrated health benefits.

I know what it’s like to work in a hospital; there are always people pulling you in different directions, there’s never enough time to get it all done, your pager is constantly going off. It’s much the same running a number of large multi-national businesses like I do now; it can feel like it’s all go, all the time, and while that’s a rush for a while, eventually the adrenaline can wear out and exhaustion hits, unless you replenish yourself in some way.

The beauty of mindfulness is you can fit it in to your life without taking any extra time. You can make use of the concept that Anthony Robbins introduced me to called ‘NET time’; No Extra Time. It allows you to use those brief moments that you might have between patients, walking to another ward, scrubbing in to surgery, to quiet you mind, to come back to this moment, to recharge, and to enter the next moment in a better state of mind.

Give it a go; it literally just might change your life.

 

Dr Sam Hazledine

 

Mindfulness Sources

Zen Habits 

Mindfulness Training

 

There’s a lot of talk about mindfulness these days, with some pretty big benefit claims. But is this just new age rah rah or are there real, demonstrated, benefits of mindfulness? And more specifically, is it of benefit to doctors?

Five key benefits of mindfulness training

According to “Doing and Being: Mindfulness, Health, and Quiet Ego Characteristics among Buddhist Practitioners,” the 2011 research article that published the survey results in the Journal of Happiness Studies (12(4): 575-589), there were five key ways that mindfulness training increased physical and mental health:  

  1. It strengthened immune system and physiological responses to stress and negative emotions.
  2. It improved social relationships with family and strangers.
  3. It reduced stress, depression, and anxiety and increased well-being and happiness.
  4. It increased openness to experience, conscientiousness, and agreeableness and reduced negative associations with neuroticism.
  5. It led to greater psychological mindfulness, which included an awareness that is clear, nonconceptual, and flexible; a practical stance toward reality; and present attention to the individual’s consciousness and awareness.

"One of the surprising findings of this study and what some others are coming up with is how much of a difference it makes to focus your mind and calm down. It actually makes a large difference in your well-being.”

Meditative mindfulness practices have been shown to positively alter the structure and neural patterns in the brain and strengthen the brain regions associated with heightened sensory processing and empathetic response. Therefore, individuals who regularly practices mindfulness training are quite literally reforming the structure of their brains to achieve desired outcomes. “We are finding more and more that the human brain is quite adaptable, as we have learnt that the brain reroutes information through new neuropathways, so in addition to the mind being adaptable, the brain too has this quality,” author of a study conducted at Northern Arizona University, Bruce Sullivan explains. Individuals who said they meditated even once a day reported greater psychological mindfulness.  

The difference between psychological mindfulness and meditative practices

Psychological mindfulness is a trait-like quality in which the individual maintains an open, accepting, present focus or attention during day-to-day life whereas mindfulness-based meditative practices include a type of mindfulness-based meditation that includes focusing on something specific, such as the individual’s breath or an object to bring awareness and concentration to the present moment. Living in modern society often leaves people feeling stressed, irritable, and exhausted. Mindfulness allows people to gain the benefits of mediation while going about their everyday activities. For these reason it is a great tool for busy medical practitioners who might struggle to take 20 minutes out of their day to meditate.

The findings from The Buddhist Health Study reveal that people are capable of transforming their everyday lives into empowering realities with a greater sense of physical and psychological well being. “The Buddhist ideals are that whatever you practice, that is what you are becoming, so if you practice being angry and shouting and so forth, you become very accomplished in doing that,” states Sullivan. “On the other hand, if you practice loving kindness, compassion and so forth, you are making yourself into that type of person.”  Thus achieving better physical well being or psychological health comes from sharpening the mind to focus and be more successfully aware.

As this study demonstrates, the conscious ability to transform an individual’s mind is perhaps the greatest ability humans have at hand to shape the direction of their lives and positively affect the lives of others around them. 

So how can doctors practice mindfulness in the busy clinical setting?

“Our true home is not in the past. Our true home is not in the future. Our true home is in the here and the now. Life is available only in the here and the now, and it is our true home.” Thich Nhat Hanh

Mindfulness is the energy that helps us recognise the conditions of happiness are already present in our lives.

Most people are forgetful; they are not really there a lot of the time. Their minds are caught in their worries, their fears their angers, and their regrets. The opposite of forgetfulness is mindfulness. Mindfulness is when you are truly here, mind and body together.

Mindfulness practice should be enjoyable, not work or effort. Do you have to make an effort to breathe in? You don’t need to strain, you just breathe in. For doctors this is an important point because this does not need to be another ‘task to do’ in your already busy day.

Five mindfulness exercises by Thich Nhat Hanh

These five exercises have been great for me, because they are easy, they take no extra time, and most importantly, they work.

 

First Mindfulness Exercise: Mindful Breathing

“The first exercise is very simple, but the power, the result, can be very great. The exercise is simply to identify the in-breath as in-breath and the out-breath as out-breath. When you breathe in, you know that this is your in-breath. When you breathe out, you are mindful that this is your out-breath.

Just recognise: this is an in-breath, this is an out-breath. Very simple, very easy. In order to recognise your in-breath as in-breath, you have to bring your mind home to yourself. What is recognizing your in-breath is your mind, and the object of your mind—the object of your mindfulness—is the in-breath. Mindfulness is always mindful of something. When you drink your tea mindfully, it’s called mindfulness of drinking. When you walk mindfully, it’s called mindfulness of walking. And when you breathe mindfully, that is mindfulness of breathing.

So the object of your mindfulness is your breath, and you just focus your attention on it. Breathing in, this is my in-breath. Breathing out, this is my out-breath. When you do that, the mental discourse will stop. You don’t think anymore. You don’t have to make an effort to stop your thinking; you bring your attention to your in-breath and the mental discourse just stops. That is the miracle of the practice. You don’t think of the past anymore. You don’t think of the future. You don’t think of your projects, because you are focusing your attention, your mindfulness, on your breath.

It gets even better. You can enjoy your in-breath. The practice can be pleasant, joyful.

Someone who is dead cannot take any more in-breaths. But you are alive. You are breathing in, and while breathing in, you know that you are alive. The in-breath can be a celebration of the fact that you are alive, so it can be very joyful. When you are joyful and happy, you don’t feel that you have to make any effort at all. I am alive; I am breathing in. To be still alive is a miracle. The greatest of all miracles is to be alive, and when you breathe in, you touch that miracle. Therefore, your breathing can be a celebration of life.

An in-breath may take three, four, five seconds, it depends. That’s time to be alive, time to enjoy your breath. You don’t have to interfere with your breathing. If your in-breath is short, allow it to be short. If your out-breath is long, let it be long. Don’t try to force it. The practice is simple recognition of the in-breath and the out-breath. That is good enough. It will have a powerful effect.

Try it between patients and see how it goes.

 

Second Mindfulness Exercise: Concentration

The second exercise is that while you breathe in, you follow your in-breath from the beginning to the end. If your in-breath lasts three or four seconds, then your mindfulness also lasts three or four seconds. Breathing in, I follow my in-breath all the way through. Breathing out, I follow my out-breath all the way through. From the beginning of my out-breath to the end of my out-breath, my mind is always with it. Therefore, mindfulness becomes uninterrupted, and the quality of your concentration is improved.

So the second exercise is to follow your in-breath and your out-breath all the way through. Whether they are short or long, it doesn’t matter. What is important is that you follow your in-breath from the beginning to the end. Your awareness is sustained. There is no interruption. Suppose you are breathing in, and then you think, “Oh, I forgot to turn off the light in my room.” There is an interruption. Just stick to your in-breath all the way through. Then you cultivate your mindfulness and your concentration. You become your in-breath. You become your out-breath. If you continue like that, your breathing will naturally become deeper and slower, more harmonious and peaceful. You don’t have to make any effort—it happens naturally.

Note from the Dr Sam Hazledine:“To start with I found meditation really difficult because of the long periods of time that was recommended. Mindful breathing is a pleasure because you’re not asking your brain to concentrate for long, just the length of a breath.”

 

Third Mindfulness Exercise: Awareness of Your Body

The third exercise is to become aware of your body as you are breathing. “Breathing in, I am aware of my whole body.” This takes it one step further.

In the first exercise, you became aware of your in-breath and your out-breath. Because you have now generated the energy of mindfulness through mindful breathing, you can use that energy to recognize your body.

“Breathing in, I am aware of my body. Breathing out, I am aware of my body.” I know my body is there. This brings the mind wholly back to the body. Mind and body become one reality. When your mind is with your body, you are well-established in the here and the now. You are fully alive. You can be in touch with the wonders of life that are available in yourself and around you.

This exercise is simple, but the effect of the oneness of body and mind is very great. In our daily lives, we are seldom in that situation. Our body is there but our mind is elsewhere. Our mind may be caught in the past or in the future, in regrets, sorrow, fear, or uncertainty, and so our mind is not there. Someone may be present in the house, but he’s not really there, his mind is not there. His mind is with the future, with his projects, and he’s not there for his children or his spouse. Maybe you could say to him, “Anybody home?” and help him bring his mind back to his body.

So the third exercise is to become aware of your body. “Breathing in, I’m aware of my body.” When you practice mindful breathing, the quality of your in-breath and out-breath will be improved. There is more peace and harmony in your breathing, and if you continue to practice like that, the peace and the harmony will penetrate into the body, and the body will profit.

 

Fourth Mindfulness Exercise: Releasing Tension

The next exercise is to release the tension in the body. When you are truly aware of your body, you notice there is some tension and pain in your body, some stress. The tension and pain have been accumulating for a long time and our bodies suffer, but our mind is not there to help release it. Therefore, it is very important to learn how to release the tension in the body.

In a sitting, lying, or standing position, it’s always possible to release the tension. You can practice total relaxation, deep relaxation, in a sitting or lying position. While you are driving your car, you might notice the tension in your body. You are eager to arrive and you don’t enjoy the time you spend driving. When you come to a red light, you are eager for the red light to become a green light so that you can continue. But the red light can be a signal. It can be a reminder that there is tension in you, the stress of wanting to arrive as quickly as possible. If you recognise that, you can make use of the red light. You can sit back and relax—take the ten seconds the light is red to practice mindful breathing and release the tension in the body.

So next time you’re stopped at a red light, you might like to sit back and practice the fourth exercise: “Breathing in, I’m aware of my body. Breathing out, I release the tension in my body.” Peace is possible at that moment, and it can be practiced many times a day—in the workplace, doing ward rounds, while you are driving, while you are cooking, while you are doing the dishes, while you are watering the vegetable garden. It is always possible to practice releasing the tension in yourself.

 

Fifth Mindfulness Exercise: Walking Meditation

When you practice mindful breathing you simply allow your in breath to take place. You become aware of it and enjoy it. Effortlessness. The same thing is true with mindful walking. Every step is enjoyable. Every step helps you touch the wonders of life. Every step is joy. That is possible.

You don’t have to make any effort during walking meditation, because it is enjoyable. You are there, body and mind together. You are fully alive, fully present in the here and the now. With every step, you touch the wonders of life that are in you and around you. When you walk like that, every step brings healing. Every step brings peace and joy, because every step is a miracle.

The real miracle is not to fly or walk on fire. The real miracle is to walk on the Earth, and you can perform that miracle at any time. Just bring your mind home to your body, become alive, and perform the miracle of walking on Earth.”

 

Give it a go

The evidence is there, it’s undeniable, mindfulness is good for us. Even some health insurance companies in the US are acknowledging this and discounting premiums for people who practice it because of the demonstrated health benefits.

I know what it’s like to work in a hospital; there are always people pulling you in different directions, there’s never enough time to get it all done, your pager is constantly going off. It’s much the same running a number of large multi-national businesses like I do now; it can feel like it’s all go, all the time, and while that’s a rush for a while, eventually the adrenaline can wear out and exhaustion hits, unless you replenish yourself in some way.

The beauty of mindfulness is you can fit it in to your life without taking any extra time. You can make use of the concept that Anthony Robbins introduced me to called ‘NET time’; No Extra Time. It allows you to use those brief moments that you might have between patients, walking to another ward, scrubbing in to surgery, to quiet you mind, to come back to this moment, to recharge, and to enter the next moment in a better state of mind.

Give it a go; it literally just might change your life.

 

Dr Sam Hazledine

 

Mindfulness Sources

Zen Habits 

Mindfulness Training

 

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