Matire Harwood Biography

Introduction to Dr Matire Harwood (PhD, MBChB) Ngāpuhi

 

When she was just seven years old, Matire Harwood’s grandfather told her she would become a doctor. Her school did not entertain the idea of a young girl from a Māori family becoming a doctor, but Matire, inspired by her grandfather’s encouragement, perused her dream anyway.

 

She’s now a GP and an Auckland University clinical researcher who’s been widely recognised for her contribution to Māori health and research into health inequities between indigenous and non-indigenous people.

 

Matire has devoted her career to investigating conditions like cardiovascular disease, asthma, stroke and diabetes, in relation to Māori health. In 2017, her work was recognised with a $25,000 fellowship in the L'Oréal UNESCO For Women in Science programme, which she is using to further research on the effects of indigenous-led interventions for long-term conditions. She has served as a member of the Board and Māori Health Committee at the Health Research Council and has worked with the Health Research Council, Ministry of Health and the Healthier Lives National Science Challenge, to improve outcomes for Māori living with diabetes.

 

In conversation with MedWorld’s Dr Sam Hazledine, Matire talks about her journey to becoming the doctor she is today, how she balances her busy schedule with family life, and what doctors can do to better engage with indigenous communities and help achieve health equity.

 

 

bio

Introduction to Dr Matire Harwood (PhD, MBChB) Ngāpuhi

 

When she was just seven years old, Matire Harwood’s grandfather told her she would become a doctor. Her school did not entertain the idea of a young girl from a Māori family becoming a doctor, but Matire, inspired by her grandfather’s encouragement, perused her dream anyway.

 

She’s now a GP and an Auckland University clinical researcher who’s been widely recognised for her contribution to Māori health and research into health inequities between indigenous and non-indigenous people.

 

Matire has devoted her career to investigating conditions like cardiovascular disease, asthma, stroke and diabetes, in relation to Māori health. In 2017, her work was recognised with a $25,000 fellowship in the L'Oréal UNESCO For Women in Science programme, which she is using to further research on the effects of indigenous-led interventions for long-term conditions. She has served as a member of the Board and Māori Health Committee at the Health Research Council and has worked with the Health Research Council, Ministry of Health and the Healthier Lives National Science Challenge, to improve outcomes for Māori living with diabetes.

 

In conversation with MedWorld’s Dr Sam Hazledine, Matire talks about her journey to becoming the doctor she is today, how she balances her busy schedule with family life, and what doctors can do to better engage with indigenous communities and help achieve health equity.

 

 

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