A conversation with an exceptional doctor: Gareth Andrews

Why you should follow your dreams

 

Continuing his conversations with exceptional doctors, Dr Sam Hazeldine talked to anaesthetic registrar Dr Gareth Andrews about chasing and achieving his dreams alongside a successful medical career. 

 Untitled_design_(5).png

You can listen to the full podcast here.

 

Gareth was fascinated by the North Pole as a child, consuming the little Penguin books about great polar explorers Scott and Shackleton. When he was 14 years old, a team who’d trekked to the North Pole shared a presentation on their experiences at Gareth’s school.

 

“That reinforced in my mind that it was possible to do,” says Gareth.

 

“The North Pole itself is the essence of adventure. You’re out on the sea ice, it’s constantly changing and moving with the winds and the tides. So although people have been before, it’s never the same for two teams… you can have two teams two miles apart and one can have a blizzard and the other can have clear skies.”

 

At the age of 30, Gareth completed an ultra-marathon run across the desert in Chile. Proving to himself he was physically and mentally ready for a bigger challenge, Gareth started researching and planning a trip to the North Pole despite being in the midst of his medical training.

 

“I had to take time off work which wasn’t easy, time out of training and I had to take out a loan because these things aren’t particularly cheap, but I made a choice to make it a part of my life and so it will be part of my life into the future,” he says.

 

By 2013, after months of training and planning, Gareth trekked across the Arctic to the North Pole. Ploughing his gear 600km through blizzards, 8km/hour winds and sub-zero temperatures, it was a test of mental and physical endurance.

 

“I loved the freedom,” says Gareth.

 

“It was incredibly liberating. You’re standing out there on an ice sheet and there’s no one else around apart from your team mates. There’s just the wind on your face and the freedom is quite remarkable.”

 

Though trekking to the North Pole and being a doctor seem wildly different, Gareth draws parallels between the two, stating that teamwork and taking care of yourself in order to help others is paramount to both.

 

“If you haven’t got your gloves on, or if you haven’t got your jacket done up properly or your goggles on and you don’t do that before you try and help your friend who is struggling […] you’re no good to anybody really.”

 

“I suppose in helping yourself you’re also helping your team mates.” In testing himself mentally and physically in nature’s most extreme environments, Gareth says he’s learnt that he has the ability to endure and stay calm under pressure as a doctor. From exams to tough seniors and even tougher rosters, Gareth knows he’s capable of pushing through and not just surviving, but succeeding.

 

Find out more about balancing polar expeditions and being a doctor in Dr Gareth Andrew’s incredible blog series about his adventures in Greenland.

 

Dr Sam Hazledine and the team at MedWorld have been exploring what it takes to exceed in the medical profession and have a healthy, fulfilling lifestyle. To find our more, click here.

Why you should follow your dreams

 

Continuing his conversations with exceptional doctors, Dr Sam Hazeldine talked to anaesthetic registrar Dr Gareth Andrews about chasing and achieving his dreams alongside a successful medical career. 

 Untitled_design_(5).png

You can listen to the full podcast here.

 

Gareth was fascinated by the North Pole as a child, consuming the little Penguin books about great polar explorers Scott and Shackleton. When he was 14 years old, a team who’d trekked to the North Pole shared a presentation on their experiences at Gareth’s school.

 

“That reinforced in my mind that it was possible to do,” says Gareth.

 

“The North Pole itself is the essence of adventure. You’re out on the sea ice, it’s constantly changing and moving with the winds and the tides. So although people have been before, it’s never the same for two teams… you can have two teams two miles apart and one can have a blizzard and the other can have clear skies.”

 

At the age of 30, Gareth completed an ultra-marathon run across the desert in Chile. Proving to himself he was physically and mentally ready for a bigger challenge, Gareth started researching and planning a trip to the North Pole despite being in the midst of his medical training.

 

“I had to take time off work which wasn’t easy, time out of training and I had to take out a loan because these things aren’t particularly cheap, but I made a choice to make it a part of my life and so it will be part of my life into the future,” he says.

 

By 2013, after months of training and planning, Gareth trekked across the Arctic to the North Pole. Ploughing his gear 600km through blizzards, 8km/hour winds and sub-zero temperatures, it was a test of mental and physical endurance.

 

“I loved the freedom,” says Gareth.

 

“It was incredibly liberating. You’re standing out there on an ice sheet and there’s no one else around apart from your team mates. There’s just the wind on your face and the freedom is quite remarkable.”

 

Though trekking to the North Pole and being a doctor seem wildly different, Gareth draws parallels between the two, stating that teamwork and taking care of yourself in order to help others is paramount to both.

 

“If you haven’t got your gloves on, or if you haven’t got your jacket done up properly or your goggles on and you don’t do that before you try and help your friend who is struggling […] you’re no good to anybody really.”

 

“I suppose in helping yourself you’re also helping your team mates.” In testing himself mentally and physically in nature’s most extreme environments, Gareth says he’s learnt that he has the ability to endure and stay calm under pressure as a doctor. From exams to tough seniors and even tougher rosters, Gareth knows he’s capable of pushing through and not just surviving, but succeeding.

 

Find out more about balancing polar expeditions and being a doctor in Dr Gareth Andrew’s incredible blog series about his adventures in Greenland.

 

Dr Sam Hazledine and the team at MedWorld have been exploring what it takes to exceed in the medical profession and have a healthy, fulfilling lifestyle. To find our more, click here.

Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.