Dr Tash Thompson's Exceptional Story

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Tash Thompson is a Paediatric Registrar at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne.

 

Her medical career has been an unusual one. She studied biomedical science and gained a graduate diploma in education before studying to become a doctor – an interest she’d had since high school. 

 

“The beauty of medicine is you’re using wells of knowledge that’s science based but it’s the art of imparting that in order to help people through health.”

 

Tash’s mother was a nurse and had warned her about the difficulties of working in medicine, but it was the long hours working as a junior doctor which came as an “unpleasant surprise”. She’d sometimes work 12 days in a row, with some of those being 14 to 16 hour long shifts.

 

“[I]t’s a lot of physical and mental and emotional stress in volumes which I think would probably be far easier to manage if it wasn’t in that volume because you sort of need time to stop and think and digest some of the things that happen day-to-day.”

 

Tash also talks about the lack of support for junior doctors, particularly during evening and night shifts when juniors are often the key decision-makers. For Tash, it reached a point where she felt like a “little mouse on a wheel” in a very stressful and unsupported role, so she “bailed”. This is a common issue and something Tash started to recognise amongst her colleagues, too.

 

“[I] was watching some people I trained with, who I knew very well and were very competent, excellent at what they did, really start to unravel by the third/fourth year of training and end up having to take leave with the different depression anxiety diagnoses.”

 

It was a turning point for Tash, who decided to take a year off to do locum work and re-discover her passion for medicine. This also gave Tash the time to explore her passion for education and how that might compliment her medical career.

 

Tash is now completing a Master’s programme part-time in clinical medial education and leads paediatric training in Emergency alongside her role at the Royal Children’s Hospital.

 

You can listen to Tash’s full story in conversation with Dr Sam Hazledine here and read the key topics from her story here

Featured_image_slider_and_Post_Featured_Image_(1).png

Tash Thompson is a Paediatric Registrar at the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne.

 

Her medical career has been an unusual one. She studied biomedical science and gained a graduate diploma in education before studying to become a doctor – an interest she’d had since high school. 

 

“The beauty of medicine is you’re using wells of knowledge that’s science based but it’s the art of imparting that in order to help people through health.”

 

Tash’s mother was a nurse and had warned her about the difficulties of working in medicine, but it was the long hours working as a junior doctor which came as an “unpleasant surprise”. She’d sometimes work 12 days in a row, with some of those being 14 to 16 hour long shifts.

 

“[I]t’s a lot of physical and mental and emotional stress in volumes which I think would probably be far easier to manage if it wasn’t in that volume because you sort of need time to stop and think and digest some of the things that happen day-to-day.”

 

Tash also talks about the lack of support for junior doctors, particularly during evening and night shifts when juniors are often the key decision-makers. For Tash, it reached a point where she felt like a “little mouse on a wheel” in a very stressful and unsupported role, so she “bailed”. This is a common issue and something Tash started to recognise amongst her colleagues, too.

 

“[I] was watching some people I trained with, who I knew very well and were very competent, excellent at what they did, really start to unravel by the third/fourth year of training and end up having to take leave with the different depression anxiety diagnoses.”

 

It was a turning point for Tash, who decided to take a year off to do locum work and re-discover her passion for medicine. This also gave Tash the time to explore her passion for education and how that might compliment her medical career.

 

Tash is now completing a Master’s programme part-time in clinical medial education and leads paediatric training in Emergency alongside her role at the Royal Children’s Hospital.

 

You can listen to Tash’s full story in conversation with Dr Sam Hazledine here and read the key topics from her story here

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