Dr Robin Youngson's Key Topics of Thought

headshot_robin_youngson.png

Dr Robin Youngson is an anaesthetic specialist, author and speaker based in New Zealand. The corruption and abuses he experienced in his early years of practice motivated him to fight for patient rights and change the system. He and his wife Meredith Youngson are the founders of Heart in Healthcare, a project which educated leaders in the medical field about the power of compassionate practice.

In conversation with Dr Sam Hazledine, Robin talked about his current work and how shocking and sad events in his past have shaped how he approaches medicine today. You can listen to the full podcast here.

Short on time? Here’s some of Robin’s key ideas which got us thinking…

 

1/ Love over passion

“The word ‘passion’ has its roots in pain and suffering. You can have life experiences which lead you to be passionate about changing the world but often it’s a painful process and you can burn out.”

Robin suggests a different approach – to choose a mission you love, which energises you. He argues this is more sustainable and you’ll achieve more this way.

“[Hearts in Healthcare] have a new rule […] it’s not to work on what would be valuable or what we’re passionate about; we actually choose the work that we love - that energizes us - and that's actually a really clever and good strategy for helping to change the world.”

 

2/ Set an example of health and fitness

“I think we also have an ethical duty to do that because if you're a doctor, how can you possibly expect any of your patients to achieve health and wellbeing if you're not role modelling that yourself?”

Robin stresses the importance of leading a healthy life for your own wellbeing, but also to set a good example for your patients. He reminds us that prevention is better than the cure.  

 

3/ Think beyond diagnosis and pills

“I really think we have some weird goals, we don't actually have a health system, we have a sickness system, we are promoting and incentivizing medicating sickness as opposed to health and wellbeing. We give GPs incentives to get patients on pills. It's crazy! You should be giving incentives to keep patients off pills.”

Robin refers to research which shows that compassionate care has a positive impact on patient outcomes.

 

4/ Treat patients as people, not problems

“I've come to understand and believe that that every human being has this incredible capacity for health, healing and wellbeing. And if we relate to our patients in a different way, if we treat them as people, if we believe in our patient, then they ‘step up’ and they find ways to manage their own health challenges. Patients become the most abundant resource that we have as opposed to a burden of care. Start thinking about abundance in generosity and believing in the capacity of your patients.”

Doctors often feel they have to ‘fix’ or ‘help’ a patient. But this assumes they are broken and judges them as incapable of helping themselves. By serving a patient you put your skills and knowledge into action to better your patient’s life.

 

You can listen to the full podcast here, or learn more about Dr Robin Youngston’s pathway to being an exceptional doctor here.

headshot_robin_youngson.png

Dr Robin Youngson is an anaesthetic specialist, author and speaker based in New Zealand. The corruption and abuses he experienced in his early years of practice motivated him to fight for patient rights and change the system. He and his wife Meredith Youngson are the founders of Heart in Healthcare, a project which educated leaders in the medical field about the power of compassionate practice.

In conversation with Dr Sam Hazledine, Robin talked about his current work and how shocking and sad events in his past have shaped how he approaches medicine today. You can listen to the full podcast here.

Short on time? Here’s some of Robin’s key ideas which got us thinking…

 

1/ Love over passion

“The word ‘passion’ has its roots in pain and suffering. You can have life experiences which lead you to be passionate about changing the world but often it’s a painful process and you can burn out.”

Robin suggests a different approach – to choose a mission you love, which energises you. He argues this is more sustainable and you’ll achieve more this way.

“[Hearts in Healthcare] have a new rule […] it’s not to work on what would be valuable or what we’re passionate about; we actually choose the work that we love - that energizes us - and that's actually a really clever and good strategy for helping to change the world.”

 

2/ Set an example of health and fitness

“I think we also have an ethical duty to do that because if you're a doctor, how can you possibly expect any of your patients to achieve health and wellbeing if you're not role modelling that yourself?”

Robin stresses the importance of leading a healthy life for your own wellbeing, but also to set a good example for your patients. He reminds us that prevention is better than the cure.  

 

3/ Think beyond diagnosis and pills

“I really think we have some weird goals, we don't actually have a health system, we have a sickness system, we are promoting and incentivizing medicating sickness as opposed to health and wellbeing. We give GPs incentives to get patients on pills. It's crazy! You should be giving incentives to keep patients off pills.”

Robin refers to research which shows that compassionate care has a positive impact on patient outcomes.

 

4/ Treat patients as people, not problems

“I've come to understand and believe that that every human being has this incredible capacity for health, healing and wellbeing. And if we relate to our patients in a different way, if we treat them as people, if we believe in our patient, then they ‘step up’ and they find ways to manage their own health challenges. Patients become the most abundant resource that we have as opposed to a burden of care. Start thinking about abundance in generosity and believing in the capacity of your patients.”

Doctors often feel they have to ‘fix’ or ‘help’ a patient. But this assumes they are broken and judges them as incapable of helping themselves. By serving a patient you put your skills and knowledge into action to better your patient’s life.

 

You can listen to the full podcast here, or learn more about Dr Robin Youngston’s pathway to being an exceptional doctor here.

Be the first to comment

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.