David Beaumont's Exceptional Story

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Former President of the Australasian Faculty of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dr David Beaumont is an advocate for occupational health. As Chair of AFOEM Policy and Advocacy Committee he was lead for the faculty project which produced the Australian and New Zealand consensus statement on the health benefits of work

 

He’s passionate about the role that work plays in people’s lives and in their own and their family’s health. Currently, David is director of Fit for Work, a business which helps people across New Zealand get back into work after injury and illness.

 

“One of the straplines we use for our rehabilitation programme is ‘return to work, return to life’,” says David.

 

“Because if we help people to recover to a degree that they get back into work, then it means they are re-engaging with their families, re-engaging with their friends, engaging with what actually motivates them in life.”

 

Originally form the UK, David started out in general practice and gained a Diploma in Occupational Medicine at the advice of a senior partner in the practice David was working in. David discovered his passion for occupational health and soon left general practice completely. It was a holiday in the Otago region of New Zealand more than ten years ago which drew David and his family to immigrate to New Zealand. He took on locum work while he and his family set up their new lives, before joining the Fit for Work team in May 2006.  

 

In his interview with MedWorld’s Dr Sam Hazledine, David explains why he thinks occupational health is important for a healthier society and why it is important for doctors to take care of themselves.

 

“From a professional viewpoint, my raison d'être is influencing the health of workers, and doctors are simply a sub-set of workers,” says David.

 

“This is an area we are really starting to focus on but there are some huge challenges because actually doctors are absolutely clear they are not good at health seeking behaviours. There are certain personality traits about being a doctor which means you absolutely don’t put yourself first.”

 

The interview is part of a series in which Sam Hazledine talks to exceptional doctors about their personal journey, philosophies and how others can become exceptional doctors too. Listen to the full interview here.

 

Short on time? Read Key Topics of Thought from the interview on our blog here.

David_Beaumont_4.jpg

Former President of the Australasian Faculty of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dr David Beaumont is an advocate for occupational health. As Chair of AFOEM Policy and Advocacy Committee he was lead for the faculty project which produced the Australian and New Zealand consensus statement on the health benefits of work

 

He’s passionate about the role that work plays in people’s lives and in their own and their family’s health. Currently, David is director of Fit for Work, a business which helps people across New Zealand get back into work after injury and illness.

 

“One of the straplines we use for our rehabilitation programme is ‘return to work, return to life’,” says David.

 

“Because if we help people to recover to a degree that they get back into work, then it means they are re-engaging with their families, re-engaging with their friends, engaging with what actually motivates them in life.”

 

Originally form the UK, David started out in general practice and gained a Diploma in Occupational Medicine at the advice of a senior partner in the practice David was working in. David discovered his passion for occupational health and soon left general practice completely. It was a holiday in the Otago region of New Zealand more than ten years ago which drew David and his family to immigrate to New Zealand. He took on locum work while he and his family set up their new lives, before joining the Fit for Work team in May 2006.  

 

In his interview with MedWorld’s Dr Sam Hazledine, David explains why he thinks occupational health is important for a healthier society and why it is important for doctors to take care of themselves.

 

“From a professional viewpoint, my raison d'être is influencing the health of workers, and doctors are simply a sub-set of workers,” says David.

 

“This is an area we are really starting to focus on but there are some huge challenges because actually doctors are absolutely clear they are not good at health seeking behaviours. There are certain personality traits about being a doctor which means you absolutely don’t put yourself first.”

 

The interview is part of a series in which Sam Hazledine talks to exceptional doctors about their personal journey, philosophies and how others can become exceptional doctors too. Listen to the full interview here.

 

Short on time? Read Key Topics of Thought from the interview on our blog here.

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