Ch ch changes| Be it in Your Doctor Jobs or Personal Lives

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In any sort of job, there is always going to be change, even doctor jobs. It might be anything from you changing jobs completely, a new management structure or new hospital policies are implemented.

 

Recently all MedRecruit staff attended Change Management workshops in preparation for making the move to a brand new database system, which will help us to deliver even more exceptional service to you. The workshops were run by an external consultant and were really well received by everyone. We’d like to share a little of what we learnt as the same principles can be applied to change in any area of your life be it personal or in your doctor jobs.

  

What is Change Management?

Change management is the discipline that guides how we prepare, equip and support ourselves and others to successfully adopt change in order to drive success and outcomes.

 

While all changes and individuals are unique, decades of research shows there are actions we can take to influence people in their individual transitions. Change management provides a structured approach for supporting individuals to move from their own current states to their own future states.

 

The Satir Change Management Model

One of the models we looked at in detail was the Satir change management model, which applies the progression through the five stages of grief to a general model of performance during the change. This can be useful to anticipate your own or others feelings and reactions that we go through as we adjust to change. This model focuses on the transition over time rather than just on change. While that might seem like a needless difference, this small factor alters the entire way that change management is approached.

 

Put simply, change happens to people and can be considered intrusive. It’s usually pushed despite what the recipient wants and they’re forced to adapt despite their feelings on the issue. Meanwhile, a transition is more of a journey over time than an abrupt alien shift. This model makes you think of the reactions and emotions you will encounter when dealing with changes.

 

Satir’s change management model is made up of five stages:

  • Late Status Quo
  • Resistance
  • Chaos
  • Integration
  • New Status Quo

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Late status quo

Late status quo is where things currently are and how they are done, be that in your doctor jobs or personal life. It’s your starting point before you introduce any changes. Your performance is consistent and you are comfortable. There may even be a feeling of complacency or boredom.

 

Resistance

Resistance is encountered when change is introduced. Here it is easy to have feelings of negativity, scepticism and denial. Performance and motivation significantly decreases and can be the point when people give up.

 

Chaos

Chaos is where the emotional impact of your changes needs addressing, as whether you made large or small changes there will be a negative reaction. Listen to feedback, answer questions, and consider implementing a support system.

 

Integration

Integration is a very mixed bag. This is both where productivity begins to sharply improve and enthusiasm takes hold, but you will still need support with any problems you encounter to make sure that you don’t lose any steam prematurely.

 

New status quo

Finally, the new status quo settles in once the change becomes the norm, and will (hopefully) result in a higher level of performance than during the late status quo.

 

Celebrate Success

While the change curve diagram portrays a linear process of change, moving back and forth between the stages is normal, as well as fluctuations throughout. It’s also important to remember to celebrate success! The journey may have been rocky and it will have been at least a little uncomfortable at times, but hopefully, you are now at a better status quo than before the change.

 

If you would like to talk to one of the MedRecruit team of experts either about making a change in your doctor jobs or your hospital or practice, then don’t hesitate to get in touch. Their team will be more than happy to guide you through the change!

Blog_Header_Right_Size_(2).png

In any sort of job, there is always going to be change, even doctor jobs. It might be anything from you changing jobs completely, a new management structure or new hospital policies are implemented.

 

Recently all MedRecruit staff attended Change Management workshops in preparation for making the move to a brand new database system, which will help us to deliver even more exceptional service to you. The workshops were run by an external consultant and were really well received by everyone. We’d like to share a little of what we learnt as the same principles can be applied to change in any area of your life be it personal or in your doctor jobs.

  

What is Change Management?

Change management is the discipline that guides how we prepare, equip and support ourselves and others to successfully adopt change in order to drive success and outcomes.

 

While all changes and individuals are unique, decades of research shows there are actions we can take to influence people in their individual transitions. Change management provides a structured approach for supporting individuals to move from their own current states to their own future states.

 

The Satir Change Management Model

One of the models we looked at in detail was the Satir change management model, which applies the progression through the five stages of grief to a general model of performance during the change. This can be useful to anticipate your own or others feelings and reactions that we go through as we adjust to change. This model focuses on the transition over time rather than just on change. While that might seem like a needless difference, this small factor alters the entire way that change management is approached.

 

Put simply, change happens to people and can be considered intrusive. It’s usually pushed despite what the recipient wants and they’re forced to adapt despite their feelings on the issue. Meanwhile, a transition is more of a journey over time than an abrupt alien shift. This model makes you think of the reactions and emotions you will encounter when dealing with changes.

 

Satir’s change management model is made up of five stages:

  • Late Status Quo
  • Resistance
  • Chaos
  • Integration
  • New Status Quo

 Satir_1.PNG

 

Late status quo

Late status quo is where things currently are and how they are done, be that in your doctor jobs or personal life. It’s your starting point before you introduce any changes. Your performance is consistent and you are comfortable. There may even be a feeling of complacency or boredom.

 

Resistance

Resistance is encountered when change is introduced. Here it is easy to have feelings of negativity, scepticism and denial. Performance and motivation significantly decreases and can be the point when people give up.

 

Chaos

Chaos is where the emotional impact of your changes needs addressing, as whether you made large or small changes there will be a negative reaction. Listen to feedback, answer questions, and consider implementing a support system.

 

Integration

Integration is a very mixed bag. This is both where productivity begins to sharply improve and enthusiasm takes hold, but you will still need support with any problems you encounter to make sure that you don’t lose any steam prematurely.

 

New status quo

Finally, the new status quo settles in once the change becomes the norm, and will (hopefully) result in a higher level of performance than during the late status quo.

 

Celebrate Success

While the change curve diagram portrays a linear process of change, moving back and forth between the stages is normal, as well as fluctuations throughout. It’s also important to remember to celebrate success! The journey may have been rocky and it will have been at least a little uncomfortable at times, but hopefully, you are now at a better status quo than before the change.

 

If you would like to talk to one of the MedRecruit team of experts either about making a change in your doctor jobs or your hospital or practice, then don’t hesitate to get in touch. Their team will be more than happy to guide you through the change!

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